ScienceDaily: Top News

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ScienceDaily: Top News


Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production
Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals
Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients
Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart
Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage
Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active
A two-atom quantum duet
Graphene on the way to superconductivity
New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery
Eye contact reduces lying
'Tunability' of a molecular chaperone
Making wind farms more efficient
Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems
A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones
Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment
Ragweed may expand its range northward with climate change
Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter
Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?
Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time
New tool to predict which plants will become invasive
Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves
Skin ages when the main cells in the dermis lose their identity and function
Unlocking the secrets of metal-insulator transitions
Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?
Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice
Transforming carbon dioxide into industrial fuels
Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru
Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field


Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 03:57 PM PST


New research looks closely at the future of maize crop yields with the effects of climate change.


Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 03:57 PM PST


For the first time, plastic microfibers have been discovered in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals. The findings were made by scientists who suggest examining scat from pinnipeds can be an efficient way to monitor environmental levels of microfibers and microplastics in the environment.


Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer's disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.


Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


People who have recently lost a spouse are more likely to have sleep disturbances that exacerbate levels of inflammation in the body, according to new research. These elevated levels of inflammation may increase risk for cardiovascular illness and death.


Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Using a rat model of bTBI, researchers show how even mild exposure to a single blast shock wave is able to induce small but potentially very meaningful pathogenic effects that accumulate with time. These effects, detected at the microscopic level, included microvascular damage, injury to nerve axons and signs of neuroinflammation in various brain regions. Brain function also changed, as shown by impaired short-term synaptic plasticity.


Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Researchers found that small improvements to a city's ParkScore -- an evaluation of a city's park system -- could lead to more physical exercise for its residents. The Trust for Public Land created the ParkScore as an index to rank the park systems of the nation's largest 100 cities, they added.


A two-atom quantum duet



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:01 PM PST


Researchers have achieved a major breakthrough in shielding the quantum properties of single atoms on a surface. The scientists used the magnetism of single atoms, known as spin, as a basic building block for quantum information processing. The researchers could show that by packing two atoms closely together they could protect their fragile quantum properties much better than for just one atom.


Graphene on the way to superconductivity



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:01 PM PST


Scientists have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. They probed the band structure at BESSY II with extremely high resolution ARPES and could identify a flat area at a surprising location.


New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:01 PM PST


Researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities.


Eye contact reduces lying



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


A new study found that eye contact can make us act more honestly.


'Tunability' of a molecular chaperone



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


Scientists report that Hsp70s from mammalian cells behave quite differently from bacterial Hsp70s. Because of the important roles Hsp70s play in protein misfolding diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the new findings 'will have a major impact on how we think about Hsp70s,' one of the researchers says.


Making wind farms more efficient



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


With energy demands rising, researchers have completed an algorithm -- or approach -- to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for builders and more renewable energy for their customers.


Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 08:27 AM PST


High levels of pollution found in many of the world's major cities are having negative effects on plants and insects, according to new research.


A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 04:30 AM PST


Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years.


Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 04:30 AM PST


Scientists have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy. Perineuronal nets modulate electrical impulses in the brain, and, should the nets dissolve, brain seizures can occur.


Ragweed may expand its range northward with climate change



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 05:53 PM PST


A new predictive model developed by ecologists and climate scientists suggests that climate change may allow common ragweed to extend its growing range northward and into major northeast metro areas, worsening conditions for millions of people with hay fever and asthma.


Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:24 AM PST


A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.


Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:24 AM PST


Scientists describe how they simulated knife motion, washing and scratching on bacteria-fighting, nanosilver-infused cutting boards to see if consumer use affects nanoparticle release. The test should help regulatory bodies identify if any safety or health risks exist from silver nanoparticles in kitchenware now being sold overseas, and if so, find ways to deal with them before the items are approved for sale in the United States.


Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:23 AM PST


Older adults with untreated hearing loss incur substantially higher total health care costs compared to those who don't have hearing loss -- an average of 46 percent, totaling $22,434 per person over a decade, according to a new study.


New tool to predict which plants will become invasive



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:22 AM PST


New research provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage.


Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:22 AM PST


Scientists have developed a completely automated technique for real-time detection of sleep/wake states in freely moving mice.


Skin ages when the main cells in the dermis lose their identity and function



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:41 AM PST


A study in mice explains that dermal fibroblasts lose their cell identify over time and with it their capacity to produce and secrete collagen and other proteins.


Unlocking the secrets of metal-insulator transitions



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:41 AM PST


Using an X-ray technique, scientists found that the metal-insulator transition in the correlated material magnetite is a two-step process.


Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


For the first time, researchers have shown they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain.


Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis more than double the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study shows that immune cells that arise during autoimmune disease cause cholesterol to become trapped inside blood vessels.


Transforming carbon dioxide into industrial fuels



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


One day in the not-too-distant future, the gases coming from power plants and heavy industry, rather than spewing into the atmosphere, could be captured and chemically transformed from greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into industrial fuels or chemicals thanks to a new system that can use renewable electricity to reduce carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide -- a key commodity used in a number of industrial processes.


Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis.


Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


A new study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. The findings suggest that repeated social interactions may tune populations of visual neurons in the face processing network to enable consistent and rapid recognition of familiar faces.
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