ScienceDaily: Top Health News

Letzten Freitag um 12:18


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Top Health News


Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not
Mining 25 years of data uncovers a new predictor of age of onset for Huntington disease
Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells
Children who use asthma tracking app have better disease control and fewer hospital visits
3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction
Protecting rare species can benefit human life
How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus
Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor
Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types
Early weight-loss surgery may improve type 2 diabetes, blood pressure outcomes
Brain's insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
How we make complex decisions
Preventive measures can reduce foot parasite in children
Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?
Flexibility of working memory from random connections
Particulate matter from aircraft engines affects airways
Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults
Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health
Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins
Fecal microbiota transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile
These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership
Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery
Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds
Nutrition: Substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish
Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus
Key step in cell protein production
Why adults at risk for Huntington's choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene
First gene that increases the risk of fainting identified
People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes
Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning
Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells
Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early
Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms
Research links civic engagement to resilience
Biomarkers to diagnose serious kidney allergic reaction
Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice
Revision to common view on how retinal cells in mammals process light
How our current thinking can sway our memories of love
CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes: New drug target for multiple cancers
Cancer drugs promote stem cell properties of colorectal cancer
Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life
How a new father views his relationship with his partner


Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'



Posted: 16 May 2019 03:59 PM PDT


Researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.'


Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not



Posted: 16 May 2019 02:00 PM PDT


Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to new research.


Mining 25 years of data uncovers a new predictor of age of onset for Huntington disease



Posted: 16 May 2019 02:00 PM PDT


Investigators have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease.


Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells



Posted: 16 May 2019 02:00 PM PDT


Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.


Children who use asthma tracking app have better disease control and fewer hospital visits



Posted: 16 May 2019 12:53 PM PDT


An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department.


3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction



Posted: 16 May 2019 12:53 PM PDT


Defects of the skull and facial bones can pose difficult challenges for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. A synthetic material called hyperelastic bone -- readily produced by 3D-printing -- could offer a powerful new tool for use in reconstructing skull defects.


Protecting rare species can benefit human life



Posted: 16 May 2019 12:53 PM PDT


Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. To better protect rare animals, insects and plants, and to prepare for an uncertain future influenced by climate change, a team of researchers is aiming to merge this conventional wisdom with a new way of thinking: arguing researchers needs to better understand how rare species benefit people outside of their existence value.


How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:29 AM PDT


Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a new study.


Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:29 AM PDT


Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables -- the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale -- contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. A new study demonstrates that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in broccoli suppressed tumor growth in cancer-prone lab animals.


Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:29 AM PDT


Changes in gene activity in specific brain cells are associated with the severity of autism in children and young adults with the disorder, according to a new study.


Early weight-loss surgery may improve type 2 diabetes, blood pressure outcomes



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Despite similar weight loss, teens who had gastric bypass surgery were significantly more likely to have remission of both type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, compared to adults who had the same procedure. Previously, no treatment has shown longer-term effectiveness at reversing type 2 diabetes in youth, which tends to advance more quickly than in adults.


Brain's insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Neuroscientists have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events.


How we make complex decisions



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps break complex decisions down into smaller pieces. The study sheds light on how the brain reasons about probable causes of failure after a hierarchy of decisions.


Preventive measures can reduce foot parasite in children



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Tungiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by penetrated sand fleas which burrow into the skin of the feet. Public health policies such as sealing house and classroom floors and daily feet washing with soap could cut the number of tungiasis cases in school-aged children, researchers now report.


Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Faster, more accurate tests for drug-resistant infections are hailed as a promising tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance, so much so that the US and Britain are offering millions in prize money for their development. A modeling study shows that better tests could, in theory, change the game and put drug-resistant bacteria at a reproductive disadvantage relative to more easily-treated strains -- but with a caveat.


Flexibility of working memory from random connections



Posted: 16 May 2019 10:56 AM PDT


Working memory is your ability to hold things 'in mind.' It acts as a workspace in which information can be held, manipulated, and used to guide behavior. It plays a critical role in cognition, decoupling behavior from the immediate sensory world. One remarkable thing about working memory is its flexibility -- you can hold anything in mind. In their new manuscript, researchers present the first model of working memory that captures this flexibility.


Particulate matter from aircraft engines affects airways



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


In a unique, innovative experiment, researchers have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. It was also shown that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engines.


Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Although the occurrence of first-ever ischemic stroke (strokes due to a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the brain) at middle age has been decreasing over time, researchers have found that the decline is not as steep as seen in older adults.


Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new study. The research shows individuals who grow up in what are essentially 'financial deserts' are slow to apply for credit and as adults have lower credit scores and more delinquent accounts.


Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Harmful algal blooms pose a unique toxic threat in Lake Erie's central basin, new research has found. Not only do blooms routinely occur in this area, which previously was not thought to be an area of concern, they can also produce types of cyanobacterial toxins that aren't typically detected through routine water-safety monitoring, according to a new study.


Fecal microbiota transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), or the transfer of stool from a healthy donor to a patient, has been found effective in reversing severe, recurring diarrheal infections from Clostridiodes difficile in adults by restoring a normal microbiome. Now, the largest study to date of FMT in children finds the procedure to be safe and effective in eradicating an infection that is on the rise among children, even those without known risk factors.


These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.


Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a study of immune responses in four people who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014. High levels of neutralizing antibodies- thought to be key to protecting someone against deadly infection -- didn't appear in patients' blood until months after they left the hospital.


Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a new study. The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients.


Nutrition: Substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Consumers will gain a health benefit from substituting part of the red and processed meat in their diet with fish, according to new calculations. Men over 50 and women of childbearing age in particular would benefit from such a change in diet.


Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


The ever-changing 'head' of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report scientists. The team discovered the structure of a naturally occurring human antibody that recognizes and disrupts a portion of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein that the virus uses to enter and infect cells. The investigators determined that the antibody, FluA-20, binds tightly to an area on the head of the HA protein that is only briefly accessible to antibody attack.


Key step in cell protein production



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Scientists have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases.


Why adults at risk for Huntington's choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


As many as 90 percent of individuals who have a parent with Huntington's disease (HD) choose not to take a gene test that reveals if they will also develop the fatal disorder -- and a new study details the reasons why. Understanding the ''why'' matters as new clinical trials testing therapies for people who haven't yet developed symptoms of Huntington disease requires participants to be tested for the HD gene to be included in the trials.


First gene that increases the risk of fainting identified



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. Based on data from more than 400,000 individuals they have identified the first gene that predisposes to fainting.


People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. Change the conversation from 'Where does this go?' to 'What does this create?' to increase recycling rates.


Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


A team of researchers has developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG.


Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


A new study challenges traditional knowledge of stem cell development. The study reveals that the destiny of intestinal cells is not predetermined, but instead determined by the cells' surroundings. The findings may make it easier to manipulate stem cells for stem cell therapy.


Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


More than one in four patients with schizophrenia and epilepsy die before reaching the age of fifty.


Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


The results of the studyshow that significant levels of fatigue and poorer brain function can persist for months, or even years, following concussion.


Research links civic engagement to resilience



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. A new study has found these simple acts of kindness not only benefited victims, but strengthened the well-being and resilience of those giving them.


Biomarkers to diagnose serious kidney allergic reaction



Posted: 16 May 2019 06:08 AM PDT


Researchers say they have identified two protein biomarkers in urine that may one day be used to better diagnose acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), an underdiagnosed but treatable kidney disorder that impairs renal function in the short term and can lead to chronic kidney disease, permanent damage or renal failure if left unchecked.


Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice



Posted: 16 May 2019 06:08 AM PDT


Researchers have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease symptoms in mice. The study shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.


Revision to common view on how retinal cells in mammals process light



Posted: 16 May 2019 06:08 AM PDT


Scientists say that new experiments with mouse eye tissues strongly suggest that a longstanding 'textbook concept' about the way a mammal's retina processes light needs a rewrite.


How our current thinking can sway our memories of love



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:24 AM PDT


As our memories fade, we rely on our current assessment of a person to remember how we felt about them in the past, and new research suggests this extends to some of the most central figures in our lives: our parents.


CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes: New drug target for multiple cancers



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


In the first large-scale analysis of cancer gene fusions, researchers used CRISPR to uncover which gene fusions are critical for the growth of cancer cells. The team also identified a new gene fusion that presents a novel drug target for multiple cancers, including brain and ovarian cancers. The results give more certainty for the use of specific gene fusions to diagnose and guide the treatment of patients.


Cancer drugs promote stem cell properties of colorectal cancer



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


Scientists have now discovered that a certain group of cancer drugs (MEK Inhibitors) activates the cancer-promoting Wnt signalling pathway in colorectal cancer cells. This can lead to the accumulation of tumor cells with stem cell characteristics that are resistant to many therapies and can lead to relapses. The researchers thus provide a possible explanation for why these drugs are not effective in colorectal cancer.


Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


Older adults who regularly take part in word and number puzzles have sharper brains, according to the largest online study to date.


How a new father views his relationship with his partner



Posted: 15 May 2019 01:54 PM PDT


A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care.
You are subscribed to email updates from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Kategorien: Wissenschaft
Alter: 14 - 18 Jahr 19 - 30 Jahr 31 - 64 Jahre 65 Jahre und älter

Teilen Sie diesen Newsletter

© 2019