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ScienceDaily: Top Health News


Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients
Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart
Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage
Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active
New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery
Eye contact reduces lying
'Tunability' of a molecular chaperone
Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment
Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter
Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?
Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time
Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves
Skin ages when the main cells in the dermis lose their identity and function
Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?
Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice
Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field
Pilot study suggests pedal desks could address health risks of sedentary workplace
A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant
Powerful method probes small-molecule structures
Toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs decoded
Multiple sclerosis: Accumulation of B cells triggers nervous system damage
Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins
Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome
Scientists shine light on minute peptide changes affecting immune system
Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education
Molecular inhibition gets cells on the move
Gene signature discovery may predict response to immune therapy


Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer's disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.


Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


People who have recently lost a spouse are more likely to have sleep disturbances that exacerbate levels of inflammation in the body, according to new research. These elevated levels of inflammation may increase risk for cardiovascular illness and death.


Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Using a rat model of bTBI, researchers show how even mild exposure to a single blast shock wave is able to induce small but potentially very meaningful pathogenic effects that accumulate with time. These effects, detected at the microscopic level, included microvascular damage, injury to nerve axons and signs of neuroinflammation in various brain regions. Brain function also changed, as shown by impaired short-term synaptic plasticity.


Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Researchers found that small improvements to a city's ParkScore -- an evaluation of a city's park system -- could lead to more physical exercise for its residents. The Trust for Public Land created the ParkScore as an index to rank the park systems of the nation's largest 100 cities, they added.


New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:01 PM PST


Researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities.


Eye contact reduces lying



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


A new study found that eye contact can make us act more honestly.


'Tunability' of a molecular chaperone



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


Scientists report that Hsp70s from mammalian cells behave quite differently from bacterial Hsp70s. Because of the important roles Hsp70s play in protein misfolding diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the new findings 'will have a major impact on how we think about Hsp70s,' one of the researchers says.


Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 04:30 AM PST


Scientists have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy. Perineuronal nets modulate electrical impulses in the brain, and, should the nets dissolve, brain seizures can occur.


Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:24 AM PST


A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.


Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:24 AM PST


Scientists describe how they simulated knife motion, washing and scratching on bacteria-fighting, nanosilver-infused cutting boards to see if consumer use affects nanoparticle release. The test should help regulatory bodies identify if any safety or health risks exist from silver nanoparticles in kitchenware now being sold overseas, and if so, find ways to deal with them before the items are approved for sale in the United States.


Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:23 AM PST


Older adults with untreated hearing loss incur substantially higher total health care costs compared to those who don't have hearing loss -- an average of 46 percent, totaling $22,434 per person over a decade, according to a new study.


Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:22 AM PST


Scientists have developed a completely automated technique for real-time detection of sleep/wake states in freely moving mice.


Skin ages when the main cells in the dermis lose their identity and function



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:41 AM PST


A study in mice explains that dermal fibroblasts lose their cell identify over time and with it their capacity to produce and secrete collagen and other proteins.


Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


For the first time, researchers have shown they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain.


Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis more than double the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study shows that immune cells that arise during autoimmune disease cause cholesterol to become trapped inside blood vessels.


Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


A new study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. The findings suggest that repeated social interactions may tune populations of visual neurons in the face processing network to enable consistent and rapid recognition of familiar faces.


Pilot study suggests pedal desks could address health risks of sedentary workplace



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


A recent pilot study by kinesiologists found that pedaling while conducting work tasks improved insulin responses to a test meal. Investigators found that insulin levels following the meal were lower when sedentary workers used a pedal desk compared to a standard desk. In addition, work skills were not decreased in the pedaling condition.


A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Tea drinkers who seek the popular beverage's soothing flavor without its explosive caffeine jolt could soon have a new, naturally low-caffeine option. Scientists report that a recently discovered wild tea plant in China contains little or no caffeine and, unlike many industrially decaffeinated products, could potentially provide many of the health benefits of regular brewed teas.


Powerful method probes small-molecule structures



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Small molecules -- from naturally occurring metabolites and hormones to synthetic medicines and pesticides -- can have big effects on living things. But for scientists to understand how the molecules work and how to design beneficial ones, they need to know the precise arrangement of atoms and chemical bonds. Now researchers have found a faster, simpler and potentially more reliable way to solve the structures of small molecules.


Toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs decoded



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Researchers decode the toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs.


Multiple sclerosis: Accumulation of B cells triggers nervous system damage



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 08:17 AM PST


B cells are important in helping the immune system fight pathogens. However, in the case of the neurological autoimmune disease Multiple sclerosis (MS) they can damage nerve tissue. When particular control cells are missing, too many B cells accumulate in the meninges, resulting in inflammation of the central nervous system. A team demonstrated the process using animal and patient samples.


Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


In a study of proteins historic in its scope, researchers have pushed closer both to a vaccine for gonorrhea and toward understanding why the bacteria that cause the disease are so good at fending off antimicrobial drugs.


Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found.


Scientists shine light on minute peptide changes affecting immune system



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Researchers have made important insights into the link between genetic diversity and the intricate changes in peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen molecules -- which help the immune system identify foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria. Their findings have important implications for understanding how the immune system recognizes infected cells in different individuals.


Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


The quality of medical certificates written by students of medicine was better when they were taught by using the flipped classroom approach instead of traditional lecturing. A randomly selected student from the flipped classroom group had an 85 percent probability to receive a better total score than a student from the traditional teaching group, according to a new study.


Molecular inhibition gets cells on the move



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Researchers revealed that two molecules, PTEN and PIP3, mutually inhibit each other to ensure their exclusive distribution at opposite ends of motile cells. This polarized distribution results in the establishment of pseudopodia only at one cell end, providing the driving force for cell movement. Although discovered in a simple organism, the slime mold, this mechanism may also be active in many more advanced species, including in mammalian immune cells.


Gene signature discovery may predict response to immune therapy



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 06:13 AM PST


Scientists have discovered a gene signature biomarker that may predict which patients will respond -- or not -- to immune therapy.
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