ScienceDaily: Top Environment News

Letzten Samstag um 11:58


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Top Environment News


Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production
Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals
Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active
Making wind farms more efficient
Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems
A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones
Ragweed may expand its range northward with climate change
Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter
New tool to predict which plants will become invasive
Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves
Transforming carbon dioxide into industrial fuels
Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru
A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant
Toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs decoded
Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins
Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome
Scientists shine light on minute peptide changes affecting immune system
Molecular inhibition gets cells on the move
Exploiting epigenetic variation for plant breeding
Most complete study on Europe's greatest Hadrosaur site published
Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots
Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change
Researchers generate plants with enhanced drought resistance without penalizing growth
One million years of precipitation history of the monsoon reconstructed


Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 03:57 PM PST


New research looks closely at the future of maize crop yields with the effects of climate change.


Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 03:57 PM PST


For the first time, plastic microfibers have been discovered in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals. The findings were made by scientists who suggest examining scat from pinnipeds can be an efficient way to monitor environmental levels of microfibers and microplastics in the environment.


Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Researchers found that small improvements to a city's ParkScore -- an evaluation of a city's park system -- could lead to more physical exercise for its residents. The Trust for Public Land created the ParkScore as an index to rank the park systems of the nation's largest 100 cities, they added.


Making wind farms more efficient



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


With energy demands rising, researchers have completed an algorithm -- or approach -- to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for builders and more renewable energy for their customers.


Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 08:27 AM PST


High levels of pollution found in many of the world's major cities are having negative effects on plants and insects, according to new research.


A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 04:30 AM PST


Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years.


Ragweed may expand its range northward with climate change



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 05:53 PM PST


A new predictive model developed by ecologists and climate scientists suggests that climate change may allow common ragweed to extend its growing range northward and into major northeast metro areas, worsening conditions for millions of people with hay fever and asthma.


Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:24 AM PST


A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.


New tool to predict which plants will become invasive



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:22 AM PST


New research provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage.


Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:22 AM PST


Scientists have developed a completely automated technique for real-time detection of sleep/wake states in freely moving mice.


Transforming carbon dioxide into industrial fuels



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


One day in the not-too-distant future, the gases coming from power plants and heavy industry, rather than spewing into the atmosphere, could be captured and chemically transformed from greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into industrial fuels or chemicals thanks to a new system that can use renewable electricity to reduce carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide -- a key commodity used in a number of industrial processes.


Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis.


A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Tea drinkers who seek the popular beverage's soothing flavor without its explosive caffeine jolt could soon have a new, naturally low-caffeine option. Scientists report that a recently discovered wild tea plant in China contains little or no caffeine and, unlike many industrially decaffeinated products, could potentially provide many of the health benefits of regular brewed teas.


Toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs decoded



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


Researchers decode the toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs.


Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


In a study of proteins historic in its scope, researchers have pushed closer both to a vaccine for gonorrhea and toward understanding why the bacteria that cause the disease are so good at fending off antimicrobial drugs.


Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found.


Scientists shine light on minute peptide changes affecting immune system



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Researchers have made important insights into the link between genetic diversity and the intricate changes in peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen molecules -- which help the immune system identify foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria. Their findings have important implications for understanding how the immune system recognizes infected cells in different individuals.


Molecular inhibition gets cells on the move



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Researchers revealed that two molecules, PTEN and PIP3, mutually inhibit each other to ensure their exclusive distribution at opposite ends of motile cells. This polarized distribution results in the establishment of pseudopodia only at one cell end, providing the driving force for cell movement. Although discovered in a simple organism, the slime mold, this mechanism may also be active in many more advanced species, including in mammalian immune cells.


Exploiting epigenetic variation for plant breeding



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


Epigenetic changes can bring about new traits without altering the sequence of genes. This may allow plants to respond quicker to changes in their environment. Plant biologists have now demonstrated that epigenetic variation is also subject to selection and can be inherited. This could expand the possibilities for crop breeding.


Most complete study on Europe's greatest Hadrosaur site published



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


The Basturs Poble site (Lleida) is the most important site in Europe when it comes to hadrosaur remains. It has yielded over 1000 fossils, probably pertaining to the same species. Palaeontologists have now published the most complete study of fossils recovered from the site and reveals the presence of many young individuals.


Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 06:13 AM PST


Around 75 percent of marine biodiversity in Finnish waters is left unprotected, reveals a performance assessment of the country's current Marine Protected Area network. Increasing protection by just 1 percent in the most biodiverse areas could double conservation of the most important species. In addition to identifying areas of high conservation value, the methodology can also be used in ecosystem-based marine spatial planning and impact avoidance, including siting of wind energy, aquaculture and other human activities.


Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 06:13 AM PST


New research has assessed the impact of global warming on thousands of tree species across the Amazon to discover the winners and losers from 30 years of climate change. The analysis found the effects of climate change are altering the rainforest's composition of tree species but not quickly enough to keep up with the changing environment.


Researchers generate plants with enhanced drought resistance without penalizing growth



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 06:13 AM PST


Extreme drought is one of the effects of climate change that is already being perceived. A team has obtained plants with increased drought resistance by modifying the signaling of the plant steroid hormones, known as brassinosteroids. The study is among the first to find a strategy to increase plant hydric stress resistance without affecting overall plant growth.


One million years of precipitation history of the monsoon reconstructed



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 06:13 AM PST


With its wind and precipitation patterns, the South Asian Monsoon influences the lives of several billion people. Recent studies indicate that its drivers are more complex than previously assumed. Scientists have now published a reconstruction of precipitation over the eastern Indian Ocean over the past one million years. It points to connections with controlling processes in the southern hemisphere that have received little attention so far.
You are subscribed to email updates from Top Environment News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Kategorien: Wissenschaft
Alter: 14 - 18 Jahr 19 - 30 Jahr 31 - 64 Jahre 65 Jahre und älter

Teilen Sie diesen Newsletter

© 2018