ScienceDaily: Plants & Animals News

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ScienceDaily: Plants & Animals News

Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies Higher egg and cholesterol consumption hikes heart disease and early death risk Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut In this nematode species males are needed for reproduction but not their genes How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death Tracking turtles with telemetry Pests and the plant defenses against them drive diversity in tropical rainforests

Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected

Posted: 15 Mar 2019 01:10 PM PDT

Scientists have completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests. The team found that some nitrate occasionally moves too fast for biological uptake, resulting in 'unprocessed' nitrate bypassing the otherwise effective filter of forest biology.

Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses

Posted: 15 Mar 2019 08:59 AM PDT

Dysregulation of the signaling pathway known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt can also cause embryo malformation and contribute for the development of breast and cervical cancer.

A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies

Posted: 15 Mar 2019 08:09 AM PDT

Scientists have discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. This happens because certain brain structures that respond to attractive odors are inhibited by a repellent one. These processes in the brain are also reflected in the behavior of the flies. This helps them to avoid spoiled or infected food sources, which would have fatal consequences for the flies and their offspring.

Higher egg and cholesterol consumption hikes heart disease and early death risk

Posted: 15 Mar 2019 08:08 AM PDT

Cancel the cheese omelet. A large, new study of nearly 30,000 people reports adults who ate more eggs and dietary cholesterol had a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death from any cause. People need to consume lower amounts of cholesterol to have a lower risk of heart disease, the study authors said.

Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut

Posted: 15 Mar 2019 06:58 AM PDT

A human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However, previous studies have estimated that only 50 percent of species in the gut microbiome have a sequenced genome, in part because many species have not yet been cultivated for study.

In this nematode species males are needed for reproduction but not their genes

Posted: 14 Mar 2019 12:17 PM PDT

In the Mesorhabditis belari roundworm, the sole purpose of males is to help females produce clones of themselves.

How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death

Posted: 14 Mar 2019 12:16 PM PDT

Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. It is also involved in signaling dangerous problems that warrant apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have discovered that the signal induced by cytochrome c is more controlled than expected.

Tracking turtles with telemetry

Posted: 14 Mar 2019 12:16 PM PDT

A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species.

Pests and the plant defenses against them drive diversity in tropical rainforests

Posted: 14 Mar 2019 12:15 PM PDT

Researchers have been baffled by tropical rainforest diversity for over a century; 650 different tree species can exist in an area covering two football fields, yet similar species never grow next to each other. It seems like it's good to be different than your neighbors, but why?

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