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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients
Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart
Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage
Eye contact reduces lying
Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment
Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time
Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves
Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?
Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field
Multiple sclerosis: Accumulation of B cells triggers nervous system damage
Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education


Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer's disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.


Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


People who have recently lost a spouse are more likely to have sleep disturbances that exacerbate levels of inflammation in the body, according to new research. These elevated levels of inflammation may increase risk for cardiovascular illness and death.


Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 12:55 PM PST


Using a rat model of bTBI, researchers show how even mild exposure to a single blast shock wave is able to induce small but potentially very meaningful pathogenic effects that accumulate with time. These effects, detected at the microscopic level, included microvascular damage, injury to nerve axons and signs of neuroinflammation in various brain regions. Brain function also changed, as shown by impaired short-term synaptic plasticity.


Eye contact reduces lying



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 09:26 AM PST


A new study found that eye contact can make us act more honestly.


Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment



Posted: 09 Nov 2018 04:30 AM PST


Scientists have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy. Perineuronal nets modulate electrical impulses in the brain, and, should the nets dissolve, brain seizures can occur.


Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:23 AM PST


Older adults with untreated hearing loss incur substantially higher total health care costs compared to those who don't have hearing loss -- an average of 46 percent, totaling $22,434 per person over a decade, according to a new study.


Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 11:22 AM PST


Scientists have developed a completely automated technique for real-time detection of sleep/wake states in freely moving mice.


Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


For the first time, researchers have shown they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain.


Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 10:05 AM PST


A new study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. The findings suggest that repeated social interactions may tune populations of visual neurons in the face processing network to enable consistent and rapid recognition of familiar faces.


Multiple sclerosis: Accumulation of B cells triggers nervous system damage



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 08:17 AM PST


B cells are important in helping the immune system fight pathogens. However, in the case of the neurological autoimmune disease Multiple sclerosis (MS) they can damage nerve tissue. When particular control cells are missing, too many B cells accumulate in the meninges, resulting in inflammation of the central nervous system. A team demonstrated the process using animal and patient samples.


Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education



Posted: 08 Nov 2018 07:59 AM PST


The quality of medical certificates written by students of medicine was better when they were taught by using the flipped classroom approach instead of traditional lecturing. A randomly selected student from the flipped classroom group had an 85 percent probability to receive a better total score than a student from the traditional teaching group, according to a new study.
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