ScienceDaily: Matter & Energy News

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ScienceDaily: Matter & Energy News


Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells
3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction
Researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials
Measuring plant improvements to help farmers boost production
Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy
Atomic 'wave function': Research sheds new light
Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation
People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes
New way to beat the heat in electronics
Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks
Australian islands home to 414 million pieces of plastic pollution
CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes: New drug target for multiple cancers
Creating high-capacity long-life batteries
Excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing in ZnO thin films
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes


Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells



Posted: 16 May 2019 02:00 PM PDT


Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.


3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction



Posted: 16 May 2019 12:53 PM PDT


Defects of the skull and facial bones can pose difficult challenges for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. A synthetic material called hyperelastic bone -- readily produced by 3D-printing -- could offer a powerful new tool for use in reconstructing skull defects.


Researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:29 AM PDT


Researchers have developed a low-cost sensor that can be interlaced into textiles and composite materials. While the research is still new, the sensor may pave the way for smart clothing that can monitor human movement.


Measuring plant improvements to help farmers boost production



Posted: 16 May 2019 10:17 AM PDT


Today, scientists have shown a new technology can more quickly scan an entire field of plants to capture improvements in their natural capacity to harvest energy from the sun.


Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. The low-cost polymer adsorbent could help push past bottlenecks in the cost and efficiency of extracting uranium resources from oceans for sustainable energy production.


Atomic 'wave function': Research sheds new light



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details of an isolated quantum system through direct observation. The method gives information about the likelihood of finding atoms at specific locations in the system with unprecedented spatial resolution far better than an optical microscope can provide. With this technique, scientists can obtain details on a scale of tens of nanometers -- smaller than the width of a virus.


Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


Researchers have developed a microelectromechanical device that detects terahertz radiation at room temperature. This device is easy to use, much faster than conventional thermal sensors, highly sensitive, and can be incorporated into detector arrays. It detects radiation using the shift in mechanical resonance frequency of a tiny suspended beam caused by the thermal expansion generated by THz radiation. This breakthrough heralds a new era of terahertz technologies, including sensors and cameras.


People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. Change the conversation from 'Where does this go?' to 'What does this create?' to increase recycling rates.


New way to beat the heat in electronics



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


Researchers combine a polymer nanofiber layer with boron nitride to make a strong, foldable dielectric separator for high-temperature batteries and other applications.


Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


Chemical engineers have designed an easy method to achieve commercially attractive carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks.


Australian islands home to 414 million pieces of plastic pollution



Posted: 16 May 2019 06:08 AM PDT


A survey of plastic pollution on Australia's Cocos (Keeling) Islands has revealed the territory's beaches are littered with an estimated 414 million pieces of plastic debris. The study estimated beaches on the Indian Ocean islands are littered with 238 tons of plastic, including 977,000 shoes and 373,000 toothbrushes.


CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes: New drug target for multiple cancers



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


In the first large-scale analysis of cancer gene fusions, researchers used CRISPR to uncover which gene fusions are critical for the growth of cancer cells. The team also identified a new gene fusion that presents a novel drug target for multiple cancers, including brain and ovarian cancers. The results give more certainty for the use of specific gene fusions to diagnose and guide the treatment of patients.


Creating high-capacity long-life batteries



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


Engineers continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Scientists recently developed a material which could significantly extend the life of batteries and afford them higher capacities as well.


Excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing in ZnO thin films



Posted: 15 May 2019 08:58 AM PDT


Researchers have found excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing at room temperature in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. The findings will greatly reduce the thermal energy loss in optical operations.


Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes



Posted: 15 May 2019 08:03 AM PDT


Washable, wearable 'batteries' -- based on cheap, safe and environmentally-friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics -- have been developed by researchers.
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