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ScienceDaily: Living Well News


Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not
Mutation makes bulldogs and Norwich terriers more susceptible to breathing problems
Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health
These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership
Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds
Nutrition: Substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish
People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes
Research links civic engagement to resilience
How our current thinking can sway our memories of love
Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life
How a new father views his relationship with his partner


Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'



Posted: 16 May 2019 03:59 PM PDT


Researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.'


Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not



Posted: 16 May 2019 02:00 PM PDT


Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to new research.


Mutation makes bulldogs and Norwich terriers more susceptible to breathing problems



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


The discovery of a new mutation associated with breathing difficulties in popular dog breeds suggests that shortened skulls causing flat faces is not the only factor that contributes to the condition, but that swelling around the airways from edema may also play a role.


Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new study. The research shows individuals who grow up in what are essentially 'financial deserts' are slow to apply for credit and as adults have lower credit scores and more delinquent accounts.


These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.


Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a new study. The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients.


Nutrition: Substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Consumers will gain a health benefit from substituting part of the red and processed meat in their diet with fish, according to new calculations. Men over 50 and women of childbearing age in particular would benefit from such a change in diet.


People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. Change the conversation from 'Where does this go?' to 'What does this create?' to increase recycling rates.


Research links civic engagement to resilience



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. A new study has found these simple acts of kindness not only benefited victims, but strengthened the well-being and resilience of those giving them.


How our current thinking can sway our memories of love



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:24 AM PDT


As our memories fade, we rely on our current assessment of a person to remember how we felt about them in the past, and new research suggests this extends to some of the most central figures in our lives: our parents.


Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


Older adults who regularly take part in word and number puzzles have sharper brains, according to the largest online study to date.


How a new father views his relationship with his partner



Posted: 15 May 2019 01:54 PM PDT


A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care.
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